THE CALDRON / Ting

Hexagram: 50 Binary Sequence: 46 (101110)

  • Upper trigram: 6 (5) LI / The Clinging / Fire

  • Lower trigram: 5 (6) SUN / The Gentle / Wind & Wood

Tholonic trigrams:

Upper

  • (5) FIRE / FIRE is the symbol of a yang on the outsides but dependent on a yin center, as the yang dissipates, much like a fire that shines light as the log is reduced to ashes. ( energy, heat,light)

Explanation

  • FIRE represents the quality that allow for manifestation, transforming idea to form. It is cardinal, fall equinox, descending, the perfect balance of lessening yang and increasing yin. Instance of this are light, consumption.

    The trigram shows the symbol of a yang on the outsides but dependent on a yin center, as the yang dissipates, much like a fire that shines light as the log is reduced to ashes.

    The quadrant of FIRE exists between the dynamic properties of RELEASE and EMPTYING and therefore represent the dissipation of energy, which bring form in to existence and light into the world. This is the balanced that represents the hight of outward expression.

  • Negotiation: The yang is built up and is ready to be released.
  • Definition: The yin returns as the yang is released, which is defined by dissipation and entropy.
  • Contribution: The energy is shared with the world, as light, heat, and movement.

Lower

  • (6) Release / RELEASE represent accumulated energy that seeks balance, and in the process of balancing itself, dissipates itself and its recipient ( lightening, Big Bang, inspiration)

Explanation

  • Release represent accumulated energy that seeks balance, and in the process of balancing itself, dissipates itself and its recipient. It is the initial outward movement that leads to expression. expression of Instance of this are lightening, Big Bang, inspiration.

    The trigram shows the symbol of yin energy re-entering the solid yang. The new yin line comes in at the lowest place of 1, beginning, birth, plant, idea. The yang is still dominant as the middle line is still yang, so the transition is yang in nature.

    The quadrant of AIR and FIRE is one of outward descending, or external yang. Here, the yang pole of the limits of sustainability has been reached, so there will be a natural movement in the opposite direction. When this extreme yang mixes with the yin there is a powerful release of yang energy, and the result is FIRE. The process of release is defined by the three states of trigram 6. This quadrant is outward because the process of creation is that of energy (yang) taking form (yin), and form exists in the outer world. Descending because the yang expands, and by doing so also dissipates itself.

  • Negotiation: When the yang energy becomes complete, not only does it have nowhere left to go, but its existence depends on the yin at this point. Here, the yang is subservient to the yin.
  • Definition: When yang meets yin it wants to release all of its energy and pushed against the limitations of the yin.
  • Contribution: The yang finds expression in FIRE, even if at the cost of the yin.

The Judgment: THE CALDRON.
Supreme good fortune.
Success.

An Explanation of the Judgment While THE WELL relates to the social foundation of our life, and this foundation is likened to the water that serves to nourish growing wood, the present hexagram refers to the cultural superstructure of society. Here it is the wood that serves as nourishment for the flame, the spirit. All that is visible must grow beyond itself, extend into the realm of the invisible.Thereby it receives its true consecration and clarity and takes firm root in the cosmic order. Here we see civilization as it reaches its culmination in religion. The ting serves in offering sacrifice to God. The highest earthly values must be sacrificed to the divine. But the truly divine does not manifest itself apart from man. The supreme revelation of God appears prophets and holy men. To venerate them is true veneration of God. The will of God, as revealed through them, should be accepted in humility; this brings inner enlightenment and true understanding of the world, and this leads to great good fortune and success.

The 'IMAGE' of the hexagram Fire over wood: The image of THE CALDRON.
Thus the superior man consolidates his fate
By making his position correct.

An Explanation of the 'IMAGE' The fate of fire depends on wood; as long as there is wood below, the fire burns above. It is the same in human life; there is in man likewise a fate that lends power to his life. And if he succeeds in assigning the right place to life and to fate, thus bringing the two into harmony, he puts his fate on a firm footing. These words contain hints about fostering of life as handed on by oral tradition in the secret teachings of Chinese yoga.

Tholonic Explanation


The Six Lines


Six at the beginning means:

A ting with legs upturned.
Furthers removal of stagnating stuff.
One takes a concubine for the sake of her son.

Commentary on the line If a ting is turned upside down before being used, no harm is done-on the contrary, this clears it of refuse. A concubine's position is lowly, but because she has a son she comes to be honored. These two metaphors express the idea that in a highly developed civilization, such as that indicated by this hexagram, every person of good will can in some way or other succeed. No matter how lowly he may be, provided he is ready to purify himself, he accepted. He attains a station in which he can prove himself fruitful accomplishment, and as a result, he gains recognition.

Nine in the second place means:

There is food in the ting.
My comrades are envious,
But they cannot harm me.
Good fortune.

Commentary on the line In a period of advanced culture, it is of the greatest importance that one should achieve something significant. If a man concentrates on such real undertakings, he may indeed experience envy and disfavor, but that is not dangerous. The more he limits himself to his actual achievements, the less harm the envious inflict on him.

Nine in the third place means:

The handle of the ting is altered.
One is impeded in his way of life.
The fat of the pheasant is not eaten.
Once rain falls, remorse is spent.
Good fortune comes in the end.

Commentary on the line The handle is the means for lifting up the ting. If the handle is altered, the ting cannot be lifted up and used, and, sad to say, the delicious food in it, such as pheasant fat, cannot be eaten by anyone. This describes a man who, in a highly evolved civilization, finds himself in a place where no one notices or recognizes him. This is a severe block to his effectiveness. All of his good qualities and gifts of mind thus needlessly go to waste. But if he will only see to it that he is possessed of something truly spiritual, the time is bound to come, sooner or later, when the difficulties will be resolved and all will go well. The fall of rain symbolizes here, as in other instances, release of tension.

Nine in the fourth place means:

The legs of the ting are broken.
The prince's meal is spilled
And his person is soiled.
Misfortune.

Commentary on the line A man has a difficult and responsible task to which he is not adequate.Moreover, he does not devote himself to it with all his strength but goes about with inferior people; therefore the execution of the work fails. In this way, he also incurs personal opprobrium.

Confucius says about this line: "Weak character coupled with an honored place, meager knowledge with large plans, limited powers with heavy responsibility, will seldom escape disaster."

Six in the fifth place means:

The ting has yellow handles, golden carrying rings.
Perseverance furthers.

Commentary on the line Here we have, in a ruling position, a man who is approachable and modest in nature. As a result of this attitude, he succeeds in finding strong and able helpers who complement and aid him in his work. Having achieved this attitude, which requires constant self-abnegation, it is important for him to hold to it and not to let himself be led astray.

Nine at the top means:

The ting has rings of jade.
Great good fortune.

Commentary on the line In the preceding line the carrying rings are described as golden, to denote their strength; here they are said to be of jade. Jade is notable for its combination of hardness with soft luster. This counsel, in relation to the man who is open to it, works greatly to his advantage. Here the counsel is described in relation to the sage who imparts it. In imparting it, he will be mild and pure, like precious jade. Thus the work finds favor in the eyes of the Deity, who dispenses great good fortune, and becomes pleasing to men, wherefore all goes well.

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